The Law Offices of Brent J. Rhodes

Connect with an Experienced Personal Injury Attorney Today

Call for free consultation: 985-262-7799

The Law Offices of Brent J. Rhodes

Connect with an Experienced Personal Injury Attorney Today

Call for free consultation: 985-262-7799

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Serious Injury Claims

Should your child get treatment at the ER after a head injury?

| Apr 5, 2020 | Brain Injuries |

Parents of active children can sometimes feel as if their second home is the emergency room (ER). From sprains and fractures to concussions, it seems as if kids are always banging themselves up and needing medical attention.

But with injuries to the head, it can be challenging to know when you should seek medical treatment and when it is all right for them to recuperate at home.

The Mayo Clinic offers some guidelines for how to treat a head injury in children. Below are some takeaways that may keep your children safer.

Minor head trauma that occurs during sports activities and other playtime doesn’t typically cause serious injuries. But, sometimes a head injury can be really scary. There are many blood vessels close to the surface in the head and facial areas, which means that there can be a lot of blood present from an injury. Even if there isn’t much blood, it can collect under the skin and form a large and unsightly hematoma.

After any head injury, it’s a good idea to notify the kids’ pediatrician and ask their recommendation. But in general, below are signs it’s a good idea to head for the ER.

When there is facial trauma

A badly lacerated lip from a ball to the face might need stitches, and any time the teeth are fractured you will want to seek medical help.

After a loss of consciousness

If your child was knocked out for even the briefest period, go ahead and get them checked out at the ER. That’s almost a certain sign of a concussion and could indicate the damage is more severe than it appears.

Your child is vomiting, disoriented or confused

Along with other symptoms like mood changes or sudden incoordination, these may indicate that a traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurred to your child.

Hold negligent parties liable for the injuries

If another person’s negligence caused or contributed to your child’s traumatic brain injury, you can hold them civilly liable for the damages that result.